Is there a danger of there being too much always-on network connectivity in a property to keep it secure?

By: Kate

20, January, 2017

Categories:

Connected Living - Data - Featured - IoT - security - Sponsor -

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The consumer sector is becoming increasingly crowded, with new technologies making the promise that our everyday personal lives can be made easier and smarter. The ‘Connected Home’, once the thing of Science Fiction, is fast becoming Science Fact.

We now have a huge range of connected devices, each with their own varying capabilities and benefits. The global market for these devices is predicted by industry analysts to grow from 6 billon today, to approximately 27 billion by 2025. Forecasts vary, but they are all talking in the tens of billions.

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We must ensure, therefore, that these devices have adequate network security. If a device is breeched then it is conceivable that a malicious third party could exploit those vulnerabilities to gain access to your home area network (HAN). Initially, any attack may not become apparent – it’s unlikely that they are looking to turn the temperature of your home thermostat, but they could be looking through Network-Attached Storage (NAS) for personal information, logging key strokes or even using your home CCTV recorders hard-drive for illegal file sharing services or borrowing processor cycles to process bit-coin transactions.

The good news is that manufacturers are taking security very seriously.

The drive for better security has evolved exponentially. Consumers are getting smarter and are selecting products not only on their features but on the level of security they provide.

Manufacturers are using high levels of encryption to ensure that it is virtually impossible for a third party to use their device as a gateway into the HAN. The key to staying protected is to regularly change passwords and when you do make sure you use a range of letters/numbers (upper and lowercase). Also, remember to change default passwords, especially on your home xDSL router. And finally, keep device firmware up to date.

These three points will keep you safe and secure.